the joy of letting go

Interesting how getting rid of so much seems to make life a lot busier! As my previous posts explain, my husband and I are downsizing by moving to a smaller suite next week. I know that once the mayhem is over, we will enjoy our efficient home in a spacious manner.

With a minimalist mindset, we have been paring down for years. However, with a reduction in square feet, even more items have to go. I have been selling and giving away many things on Kijiji and Bunz, as well as donating to charities. So many interesting people have walked through my life in the last couple of weeks and the conversations have been lovely. A mom needed Continue reading

home address

full-hammock_long

As a child living on a rural property, I spent a lot of time outside, mostly alone I imagine, absorbing seasonal stories as I wandered from flowering fields to deep stands of sumac. The shifting sediment in the quarry sometimes exhumed its natural inhabitants, as the pioneer rock piles handed over evidence of a past life, chipped and pretty.

The photo album in my head then flips open to images of Continue reading

Declutter as if you are moving

My friends smile indulgently as I mention yet again that we have let go of several items in our home. “You won’t have anything left!” I do not mind the teasing as I know that my actions provide inspiration to get organized, or at least make for interesting conversation. (Readers share their stories in “What Our Stuff Means to Us“)

The interactions that give me pause however are with those who have to deal with the sudden ejection of household items, perhaps due to a change in circumstances that requires a downsize, or a parent’s home needs to be put on the market after they have passed on. Objects stir up emotions, hence why we ‘store and ignore’ (see my LinkedIn article last year called “Steps for Un-storing Your Possessions“). Continue reading

an organized view of a minimalist’s wardrobe

A photo of author Jo Bennett wearing a structured 40's inspired wool hat.

My Lillie and Cohoe winter hat happily received by a colleague.

I don’t have enough clothes.

Folks who know me could take this statement two ways. It may not be a surprise that my wardrobe is small. My Facebook friends are used to my photo posts, featuring many formerly-loved items I want to give away, such as evening wear, hats, jewelry and handbags. I drop off clothes in good condition at Goodwill about four times a year. On the other hand, should a minimalist desire to own more things? Ultimately, my goal is to be aware of what I need and what I want. Continue reading

a simple move

a photo of well organized tupperware and bowls on kitchen shelves.

Rearranging the everyday things.

I do not get a chance to type just about organizing very often. This is long overdue!

As a minimalist, I appreciate having fewer things to wash or dust and put away. As an organizer, I am relieved that I know exactly where the objects I do have are placed and I try to keep them in order. Our home is not empty by any means and there is always an area that could be improved upon. Continue reading

what our stuff means to us

As a Life Coach, I accompany clients as they emotionally and mentally ‘declutter’ and the topic of physical disorganization comes up as an additional barrier to engaging meaningfully with their life work. This lead me to pursue over the past year training courses with The Professional Organizers of Canada (POC) to provide me with additional context and understanding. While reviewing my POC class notes, I was reminded of several reasons why we are so attached to certain ‘things’ and therefore it may be difficult to let them go. I decided to post a discussion about this on my Facebook page and it proved to be a hot topic! I mentioned that certain objects may:

  • provide a sense of security,
  • portray status,
  • contribute to our identity,
  • represent family/friends/memories.

I asked my friends and colleagues to reflect on these points and, with their permission, here are several of their responses: Continue reading